EVS GLOBAL CHANGE

29/07/2010

CHILD NUTRITION PROJECT –

Lunch for disadvantaged children at Burmese Learning Center


The 90 students of the Burmese learning center in Kuraburi need our help.

As a result of their parents’ poverty, most children’s nutrition is very unhealthy.
While a few get packed lunch, many eat sweets for breakfast and dry instant noodles for lunch.
FACTS:
The Kuraburi area, and southern Thailand in general, is home to a large population of Burmese migrant workers. These hardworking people often come illegally in the hope of finding income and a better life. Their children mostly lack access to education and adequate nutrition. Unlike so many other areas, Burmese children living near the Kuraburi pier are able to take classes at a learning center. The dedicated teachers at the center have requested our help in providing lunch for the children. Without a food budget, and barely able to cover teacher salary, the center needs our help to make sure the kids have a healthy lunch.
SOLUTION:
It costs less than $1 USD per day to make a difference.
Financial support is needed for cooking equipment plus ingredients for 90 meals a day, 5 days a week, for the nine month school year. The teachers would prepare the food which, and would receive semi-annual cooking stipends of 1,000 baht per month, shared between the cooks.
The lunch program will:
 guarantee that children have one healthy nutritious meal a day
 create community by bringing together teachers and volunteers to cook and then share a meal with the children
 give the children an opportunity to learn roles and responsibilities during cooking, eating, and cleanup
 alleviate the financial burden on already struggling parents

PLEASE HELP – YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE QUALITY OF LIFE AND GENERAL HEALTH OF THE CHILDREN

NEEDS: 

In total, we are aiming to raise at least 9 months (one school year) worth of lunch money. The cost of feeding the children for a month is $1,250 (960 Euro), meaning we hope to raise a total of $11,000 (8,500 Euro).

Please contribute whatever you can, and together, we can do it!

GO TO: WWW.ANDAMANDISCOVERIES.COM/RESERVATIONS-PAYMENT.PHP AND PUT ‘LUNCH’ AS REFERENCE

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT INFO@ANDAMANDISCOVERIES.COM

16/07/2010

The amazing maya ruins in Chiapas

The Yucatan Peninsula is rich of ancient Mayan city ruins. Basicly you can find mayan cities in this part of Mexico and Guatemala. For more transparency here yo have a map:

The first mayan ruin I’ve ever visited is Tenam Puente, which is located close to Comitán.

(Comitán is the fourth most important city in Chiapas State)

The archeological site Tenam  Puente is located in the  border of the Mayan empire.

This city doesn’t has that much importance, but it’s good to start to understand Mayan architecture.

Mayans always used the facilities of the nature, so in Tenam Puente they used the hills to construct their city.

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The next ruin to visit is Bonampak. Bonampak is located in the Lacandon Jungle, close to the town called San Javier y Lacanjá Chansayab. Boonam Pak’ means painted wall in modern maya. While the site is not overly impressive in terms of spatial or architectural size, it is well-known o it’s murals. This city is quite the only place where the murals were conserved.

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In this mural you can see one of the sacrificial rites of the aristocracy. In the ancient maya world only the aristocracy were aloud to make sacrificies. In this pics the women are piercing their tongue and the men their penis. Then blood is collected in a pot and offered to the Underworld Goods.

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My next Mayan ruins to be visited was Yaxchilán. Yaxchilán is located on the bank of the Ucumacinta River. Ucumacinta means mono aullador in Spanish, and Howler monkey in English. This river is a natural border between Mexico and Guatemala. It also the largest river in Mexico and Guatemala by volume. To get to the arqueological site, you have to take a boat from the town called Frontera Corozal, the river journey is around 45 minutes, and you can abserve howler monkey, birds and crocodiles. Yaxchilán means “green stone” in Mayan language. In the Late Classic period  this city was one of the most powerful states along the Ucumacinta region. There is a theory that a bridge was leading across the river to the Guatemalan side, where the folk lived. Aristocracy lived in the Mexican site.

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In Lacandon jungle there is a story about goblins. Lacandon people belives that goblins exist. Goblins are small creatures, they look like children, and they are talking in their own language. They say that normaly they don’t harm people, they are only playful, and they like to rob things from the people. But if you get lost in the jungle, is an other story. Basicly there is no diference if you are found by canibals or goblins, as there are stories about lost people found by goblins, who were fattened and then eaten by goblins.

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The last ruins I visited in Chiapas is Palenque. This Maya city was flourished in the seventh century. After its decline it was absorbed into the jungle, but has been excavated and restored. The most famous ruler of Palenque is Pakal the Great whose tomb has been found and excavated in the temple of the inscriptions. Is very interesting, that going to the top of this temple there are 68 steps, the same number as the years Pakal was ruling this place. To go down to his tomb you have to descend 69 steps, one step more. Near to this temple you can find the tomb of the Red Queen, who was the wife of Pakal.

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My next Mayan ruins to be visited was Yaxchilán. Yaxchilán is located on the bank of the Ucumacinta River. Ucumacinta means mono aullador in Spanish, and Howler monkey in English. This river is a natural border between Mexico and Guatemala. It also the largest river in Mexico and Guatemala by volume. To get to the arqueological site, you have to take a boat from the town called Frontera Corozal, the river journey is around 45 minutes, and you can abserve howler monkey, birds and crocodiles. Yaxchilán means “green stone” in Mayan language. In the Late Classic period  this city was one of the most powerful states along the Ucumacinta region. There is a theory that a bridge was leading across the river to the Guatemalan side, where the folk lived. Aristocracy lived in the Mexican site.

14/07/2010

Quand le Sud de la France rencontre sur la table le Sud de la Thailande ! Aïoli iiiiiiiii les amis !

Aïoli et Ratatouille , un régal, des papilles qui frétillent, le retour aux saveurs provençales et qu’est ce que ça fait du bien. Ce soir au menu de Cucina : Cuisine Française et Thaïlandaise, autant vous dire les 2 meilleures cuisines du monde réunies ensemble le résultat est explosif !


Mes amis de Marseille m’ont rendu visite cette semaine, et m’ont donné un gros coup de main pour la cuisine. Jules s’est chargé de l’Aïoli et de la Purée avec ma prof de cuisine Chef Tu, elle était d’ailleurs l’étudiante, l’étudiante parfaite, et avec Margot nous nous sommes occupés de la Ratatouille, du poisson et du poulet au cacahuète. Du côté Thai, c’était champignons party, avec Sauce aux champignons, Salade de Champignons et Champignons grillé avec Nan, Pee Nat and Awe.

Ratatouille for 5 people :

Ingredients :

– 1 kg of ripe tomatoes

– 5 Purple Eggplant

– 2 big onions

– 4 cloves of garlic

– 2 red pepper

– 2 green pepper

– 5 zucchini

– Herbes de Provence

– Thym

– Olive Oil

– Water

– Brown Sugar

– Salt and Pepper

Directions:

Cut all the vegetables in square. For the garlic don’t need to pill it, just mashed once and keep its flesh in its skin. Start to cook in a big cooking pot : Eggplant, Zucchini, onions and garlic, add around 3 big spoon of olive oil, a little bit of salt and pepper, Herbes de Provence and Thym, 10 minutes later add Green and Red Pepper, one glass of water to make your vegetables softer and maybe a little bit of olive oil, 10 minutes after that, add half of your tomatoes,  1 big spoon of Herbes de Provence, 2 big spoon of sugar, salt and pepper and 1 tea spoon of thym, 5 minutes after that add your last tomatoes. Let it cook maybe 10 minutes or less something like that. You can serve this dish cold or hot with chicken and rice.

Aioli

Ingredients:

15 cloves of garlic

1 liter of Olive Oil

4 yok

salt and pepper

Directions:

Mashed your garlic until you get something soft, add salt ( around 3 tea spoon ) when you get something smooth add your yok and a little bit of olive oil, this step is very important, you start to stir in the same direction without stopping and add olive oil little by little, you will get something hard, same texture as a mayonaise. When you get your sauce ready hard and tasty, put in a fridge.

Serve with:

Fish ( normally we eat salty fish with Aioli as cod- fish) and shellfish as whelk ( that’s sooooo goood )

Steamed or raw vegetables ( tua fak yaow, asperagus, carotts, potatoes, turnip)

Bread

White Wine

At home we just eat aioli with everything, every kind of meat, every kind of fish or shellfish, or even french fries and sandwiches for a snack.


13/07/2010

WorldCup Championship

Filed under: India, Orissa volunteers, Indian Diary — evs global change @ 15:47

After the mid-term training we were eager to work.  We got new impetus to prepare the schedule for the next months. Unfortunately, the visits to Khirisai were postponed, once because some riots were in the area and second time because of big religious event, called Ratha Yatra. As the plans are always changing, we changed also our schedule and now working on the new website, writing a comprehensive project documentation, prepairing a presentation to the local tourism department for the future cooperation.

Sunday evening we watched the Football Championship Final with Manu and his family. Just for 1 month, in India instead of Kricket everybody was talking about Worldcup Championship, that was amazing. For the final, we prepared some snacks like bacon-bite and aubergine-cream… something european, our host enjoyed it, at least they told that 🙂 And Spain won, the team for which we were cheering! That was a good night.

Ami from Bhubaneswar/India

06/07/2010

Photo album Picasa – Chilika lake, India

Filed under: India, Orissa volunteers, Indian Diary, Indian Photo Album — evs global change @ 10:52

For more pictures about our Project please click on the following link:

http://picasaweb.google.co.in/pelocamalia/ChilikaLakeProjectArea?feat=directlink

I’ll try to upload pictures to WordPress how much I can, but Picasa is still easier for me.

Greetings and enjoy the pictures!! 🙂

Ami from Bhubaneswar

Mid-term training in Incredible!ndia

Filed under: India, Orissa volunteers — evs global change @ 09:14

For the mid-term training we were awaiting Bertrand from Pistes Solidaires. On 26th of June our little team (Zita, Chris, Ami) with Manu went to pick up him from the airport. Because we had just 2 full days for the training we thought to start at the evening with a dinner and informal discussion. After the delicious dinner we continued the discussion in the restaurant until mid-night when we were asked to leave because they were closing. Unfortunately in Bhubaneswar almost everything close at mid-night, so we had to continue the talk next day.

Next day everybody was fresh and fit, so we could start the meeting in the office. Manu gave a little presentation about JRP, then we discussed our project progress from the beginning until now.

As Bertrand hasn’t been here when we had our on arrival training, the presentation contained the project goals, the progress and where are we now.

After finishing some paperwork we had our lunch. Then Manu and Bertrand had a meeting while we planned the afternoon what to visit in the city.Budhist temple - Peace pagoda

The city sighteen tour started with a visit at Peace Pagoda on the top of Dhauligiri hill. After walking around we were entering to the nearby Buddhism temple when raining started. So the “Spice Girls” and B had been stucking in the temple for a while. This time of the year is the monsoon season when rain is expected very often. So this heavy rain was very normal but our plans were canceled :S. We had to skip Khandagiri and Udayagiri Jain’s cave but as another option we visited Iskon temple, which is a Khrishna temple and Sunday usually they have a festival. After watching this performance we picked up Manu and went to have the dinner at a nearby Restaurant. The evening continued in Bertrand’s hotel room :), where we shown him pictures took as yet.

The project area visit has been planned for the second day, especially the visit in Mahisa village and handicraft activity with another villagers who belongs to the Domo lowest cast.

We started at 7 o’clock not so fresh and fit that day and arrived in the last minute to Satapada to take the vessel to Jahinkuda. The delay was due to our little long breakfast at a favorite “puri” fast food place. I hope Bertrand enjoyed eating from the leaf plate and the traditional puri breakfast :).

After reaching the island an 15 minutes long footpath leaded to the place where a boat should waited for us. After 10 minutes the boat arrived and dropped us to the opposite bank of the lake. The women from the village were already waiting for us, they were cheering when we jumped out from the boat. All together accompanied by the women headed to the school where we had a short meeting with them. The well-practiced singing ritual was performed, we started with the Lion Sleep Tonight song which was not the best /we have to practice it more/ then 3 women started to sing their traditional song. That is very interesting, on some religious festivals they used to sing 2 days long without stopping.

After a half our meeting, where everybody was introduced and talking about our plans, we continued the trip with a walk on the island. Some tourist spots were shown to Bertrand to have an idea what would we like to develop in the village. Due to tight schedule, after a delicious homemade indian lunch we started the journey back to the mainland. The next stop was at the Domo people’s house, where they taught us how to make bamboo handicrafts. The Domo’s traditional source of living is from making and selling handicrafts.

We also wanted to show Bertrand the beach in Puri, which is a very famous City in India due to the very famous Jagganath Temple. Unfortunately foreigners are not allowed to go inside, so we skipped it and went directly to the beach. :). The water was amazing with big waves and strong current. We arrived back at mid-night to Bhubaneswar.

Bertrand had his flight next day morning at 10 o’clock, so before departing we had the breakfast together and a talk about our future plans related with work and personal plans also.

The training was short but meaningful. This time we had the opportunity to meet Bertrand, another member of Pistes Solidaire, to share ideas related with the project and to make a brief overview for the second part of EVS and last but not least we spent a good time together.

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